Learning Character

There’s something to be said about how we can teach our children to have good character.

Contrary to popular belief, simply having a citizen of the month ceremony is not how it’s done. What really makes the difference (for all learning) is having the time allow kids to have the opportunity to see it, feel it, and to learn for themselves. Teaching character is no different.

Genuine discussion (not yelling, belittling, or avoiding) both the good and bad examples of real life character, is another component that we’re happy that our families also see the value in.

I’m currently listening to our students and teachers reflecting on their experiences at Localtopia last year and how they’ll improve on what they learned. Positive across the board.

But here’s another example of how we demonstrate one of our values, “using our mistakes to thrive.”

A few of our students spaced out during a lesson, yes-no one is perfect. Instead of getting upset or initiating an arbitrary behavior management plan, we simply took it as an opportunity to teach, aka provide perspective and understanding.

The kids will share their thoughts in their video blog below, but if you haven’t already seen the $100 race challenge video, take a look to set the tone. And then hear a bit of what our kids came to understand as a result.

I wish I would have recorded their immediate conversation because that was the most powerful. To hear that they understand their own challenges and opportunities, but that they also understand one another’s is how we work towards constant progress and true character development.

One lesson gone awry and taught the kids empathy, how to amend and take ownership for their actions, to see things through the eyes of others, provided an opportunity for reflection of their own situations at this time in their lives, to be grateful for their families, and to remind themselves that they’re in control of their futures.

I wish I would have recorded their immediate conversation because that was the most powerful. To hear that they understand their own challenges and opportunities, but that they also understand one another’s is how we work towards constant progress and true character development.

One lesson gone awry and taught the kids empathy, how to amend and take ownership for their actions, to see things through the eyes of others, provided an opportunity for reflection of their own situations at this time in their lives, to be grateful for their families, and to remind themselves that they’re in control of their futures.

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